Some problems arise when compliance with a condition precedent is expressly determined by the satisfaction of a single party. For example, misrepresentation and fraud are also defences against treaties. Misrepresentation is when one party makes a false statement that induces the other party to enter into the contract. Fraud is a closely related concept, and it simply means that a party has used deception to acquire money or property. Often, unscrupulous sellers commit fraud or present the object of the contract so badly that the other party hands over the contract. However, in such circumstances, fraud and misrepresentation can be used as a successful defense. Explicit conditions: conditions expressly specified in the contract. There are other problems that arise when the payment of the contract price depends on a condition. Consider this example: a treaty is an enforceable promise. Once the promise is kept, the terms of the contract are fulfilled. This means that the parties will be relieved once the parties have fulfilled their obligations under the treaty and are exempted from other requirements for the performance of the contract. of the Treaty, because they have already fulfilled their legal obligations under this Treaty. That is to say, they have satisfactorily fulfilled their obligations under the Treaty.

Fulfillment of the legal obligations imposed on us by the contractual conditions. It is simply to assume the legal obligations imposed on us by the contractual conditions. This is certainly what the parties hope for when they conclude a contract – the successful execution of the contractual conditions and the subsequent dismissal of the contract. Second, there is an implied condition of cooperation according to which the obligation of one party to perform the contract depends on the participation of the other party in that performance. For example, if a party does not, without legally justified reason, make the contractual conditions, the party is qualified as an infringementThe non-compliance with contractual obligations and obligations. of the Treaty. In a service contract – for example. B a service for the construction of a house – the performance standard is an essential serviceThe standard for service contracts. This means that the performing party acted in good faith and gave the other party sufficient benefits of the contract that the other party could use it for the intended purpose and that defects arising from the contract could be corrected by cash damages. . . .